BA Introduction to Forensic Science 1

Course Info
Course Title: 
BA Introduction to Forensic Science 1
Grade Level: 
11
Course Format: 
Online
Teacher(s): 
G Porro
Course Description
Description: 

Forensic science is the application of science to law. Any science can be applied into a legal situation. In order to be a forensic scientist you must first be a scientist. You must have a strong grounding in the science you are interested in before you can apply that science into a legal setting and become a forensic scientist. This course aims to explain the scientific principles and techniques behind the work of forensic scientists and will be illustrated with numerous case studies. This course is designed to capture the imagination of students and perhaps plant the seed
for further study in sciences. Upon completion of the Forensic Science courses, students may decide to investigate further study in this area or pursue a career in this field.

Pre-requisites: 
None
No. Exams: 
2
Proctored Exams: 
No
Resources: 

Must have access to the Internet - FVDES Website and external web links.

No. Modules: 
8
Course Modules: 

Unit 1:Introduction to Forensic Science


Objectives:


Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Learn about forensic science as a field of study.
  • Discuss the history and development of the field of forensic science.
  • Examine some of the responsibilities that forensic scientists have in their work.
  • Investigate the relationship between forensic science and the criminal justice system.
  • Explore some of the specialty areas within forensic science. 

Unit 2: The Crime Scene

 

Objectives:


Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to: 

  • Discover how a crime scene is secured.
  • Examine the different ways in which a crime scene is recorded.
  • Verbalize how forensic scientists and officers search a crime scene for evidence.
  • Investigate how evidence is collected and packaged.
  • Distinguish how evidence needs to be collected carefully and within legal guidelines

 

 

Unit 3: Physical Evidence

 

Objectives:


Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Interpret the different types of evidence.
  • Examine the difference between individual and class characteristics and what they mean for crime investigations.
  • Discuss how physical and chemical properties help forensic scientists compare samples.
  • Investigate glass fragments and soil as physical evidence and what they can tell forensic scientists about a crime.
  • Summarize how impressions, like footprints and tire tracks, are collected and analyzed. 

    Unit 4: Physical Evidence: Hair, Blood, and Fingerprints


    Objectives:


Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to: 

  • Observe the physical structures of hair, blood, and fingerprints.
  • Discuss how DNA can be found in hair collected from crime scenes.
  • Investigate how stains are tested to determine if they are blood and if they are human blood.
  • Explore the different types of fingerprints.
  • Examine how fingerprints are discovered and collected at a crime scene.

 

 

MIDTERM EXAM:

  • Midterm test will cover items from Units 1-4
  • A series of midterm discussion questions will also be presented and will form part of the exam.

 

 

 

 

    Unit 5: Firearms and Tool Marks

    Objectives:

Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Discuss how firearm and bullet evidence is collected from a crime scene.
  • Analyze why bullets fired from a gun can contain unique markings and striations.
  • Examine how investigators can estimate the distance between a gun and a shooting victim.
  • Investigate what information forensic scientists can learn from tool marks.
  • Discuss how forensic scientists can recover serial numbers from firearms and vehicles.

 

    Unit 6: Human Remains
    Objectives:
Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Investigate some of the ways that can help determine the time of death.
  • Interpret some different ways that bodies may decompose.
  • Discuss what forensic scientists can learn from a forensic autopsy.
  • Examine what information can be gained from skeletal remains.
  • Explore ongoing research into decomposition rates.

 

    Unit 7: DNA Evidence
    Objectives:
Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Learn and list the properties of DNA.
  • Examine how and why DNA can be used as an individual characteristic in forensic science.
  • Investigate how biological evidence is best collected and preserved for DNA testing.
  • Compare what tests are used on biological evidence to retrieve DNA information.
  • Examine some of the considerations in using DNA in court trials.

    Unit 8: Arson and Explosion Evidence
    Objectives:
Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Actively discuss what challenges arson and explosion crime scenes present in the collection, preservation, and analysis of evidence.
  • Learn how investigators determine where a fire started and whether accelerants were used.
  • Analyze various types of explosive materials that may have been used at a crime scene involving an explosion.
  • Investigate how evidence at an arson scene is collected and tested.
  • Discuss the methods used to test for explosive materials at crime scenes.

FINAL EXAM:

  • Final test will cover items from Units 5-8
  • A series of final discussion questions will also be presented and will form part of the exam.
Textbook Deposit: 
$0.00

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